Optional: Abundant Shrine

Route 14

Before you can get to the Abundant Shrine, you have to first go through Route 14, so go ahead and head south of Undella Town to get there.

There are a few ways to get there, so just take the simplest and climb the first waterfall you see. That should take you up to an area by a Fisherman, who was actually previously accessible. The second waterfall nearby, however, was not, so climb up there and then land over by the trees.

Follow the path to the west and you'll find a Black Belt. He uses a Heracross L52, a Gigalith L52, and a Conkeldurr L52. Right past him is a Nugget. Pick it up, then fall down the nearby waterfall.

Head over to the east and you can find a hidden Protein, but don't jump down the ledge unless you want to have to climb up a waterfall again! Instead, head west until you find the entrance to the Abundant Shrine.

Abundant Shrine

Abundant Shrine
Wild Pokemon Types Level(s) Rarity
Swablu Swablu Normal / Flying Lv. 33 20%
Cottonee Cottonee Grass Lv. 33, 35
Black 2: 30%
White 2: 0%
Petilil Petilil Grass Lv. 33, 35
Black 2: 0%
White 2: 30%
Vulpix Vulpix Fire Lv. 34 10%
Bronzor Bronzor Steel / Psychic Lv. 32 15%
Marill Marill Water Lv. 34 10%
Golduck Golduck Water Lv. 34 10%
Altaria Altaria Dragon / Flying Lv. 36 5%
Thick Grass Types Level(s) Rarity
Vulpix Vulpix Fire Lv. 37 20%
Cottonee Cottonee Grass Lv. 37, 39
Black 2: 35%
White 2: 0%
Petilil Petilil Grass Lv. 37, 39
Black 2: 0%
White 2: 35%
Altaria Altaria Dragon / Flying Lv. 38, 40 15%
Marill Marill Water Lv. 38 10%
Golduck Golduck Water Lv. 38 10%
Bronzong Bronzong Steel / Psychic Lv. 36 10%
Shaking Grass / Swirling Dust Level(s) Rarity
Audino Audino Normal Lv. 33 ~ 36
Black 2: 80%
White 2: 75%
Emolga Emolga Electric / Flying Lv. 34 10%
Azumarill Azumarill Water Lv. 36
Black 2: 0%
White 2: 5%
Whimsicott Whimsicott Grass Lv. 36
Black 2: 5%
White 2: 0%
Lilligant Lilligant Grass Lv. 36
Black 2: 0%
White 2: 5%
Ninetales Ninetales Fire Lv. 36 5%
Surfing Types Level(s) Rarity
Basculin Basculin Water Lv. 25 ~ 40
Black 2: 70%
White 2: 0%
Basculin (Blue) (Blue) Basculin (Blue) Water Lv. 25 ~ 40
Black 2: 0%
White 2: 70%
Marill Marill Water Lv. 25 ~ 40 30%
Surfing (in surfacing fish) Level(s) Rarity
Marill Marill Water Lv. 25 ~ 40 60%
Basculin (Blue) (Blue) Basculin (Blue) Water Lv. 25 ~ 40
Black 2: 35%
White 2: 0%
Basculin Basculin Water Lv. 25 ~ 40
Black 2: 0%
White 2: 35%
Azumarill Azumarill Water Lv. 30 ~ 40 5%
3 starVulpixNinetalesPokemon Review: Vulpix & Ninetales
Vulpix Sprite
Fire
Ninetales Sprite
Fire

The fiery fox, Vulpix, may appear cute in its appearance, but once it evolves into Ninetales by using a Fire Stone on it (or, rarely, catching one in the shaking grass in the Abundant Shrine), it becomes much more fierce — not to mention it gains an extra three tails. Vulpix's stats aren't really worth mentioning, but Ninetales' are alright. It has great Speed and Special Defense, faster than all non-legendary Unova Fire-type Pokemon except for Simisear, who it loses to by the smallest imaginable margin, and Volcarona, which it ties with. It's only beaten in Special Defense by Volcarona, too, and even then by just a small amount. Its Special Attack leaves a lot to be desired, though: it's simply mediocre. Its Attack is actually right in that neighborhood, too, as is its Defense and HP. It's pretty well-rounded, at least, like a Fire-type Golduck in a lot of ways. It has the Flash Fire ability, which raises the power of its Fire-type attacks whenever it is hit by a Fire-type attacks, plus it renders all Fire-type attacks against it useless. Handy. If you're very patient, you can find a Vulpix in the Hidden Grotto (in the Abundant Shrine) with the Drought ability, which changes the weather to sunny as soon as you send it out, making it an amazing ability that effectively raises its Fire-type attacks' power by 50% and weakens Water-type attacks' power by 50% as well. It's not exactly easy to get, though, but that makes a HUGE difference in how viable it is.

One thing to keep in mind is that Ninetales does not learn any new moves by leveling up, so you'll have to consider carefully before evolving it that you have all of the level up moves you need. Thankfully, it doesn't pick up too many later ones you'll absolutely have to have. Extrasensory at level 39 is a nice Psychic-type attack for it. Hex (should be a default move) can be kept if you plan on burning the foe with Will-O-Wisp (level 26 and probably already learned, unless you have a higher level one), as it will double Hex's power. Confuse Ray works well with Ninetales' high Speed to cripple the foe while it sets up (it can relearn it as a Ninetales, though, so don't worry). That's probably all you'll need to consider, though. It does have Flamethrower, but you should have the TM for that, making it a non-issue. Flamethrower is definitely a great move for it, though! As a Ninetales, you can visit the Reminder Girl to have her "reteach" Nasty Plot, which raises Ninetales' Special Attack by an impressive two stages, giving it a lot more power behind its attacks. That can be a very handy move for it!

For TMs, you've got the standard choice between Flamethrower (can obviously be taught whenever) and Fire Blast. Since Ninetales lacks high Special Attack, Fire Blast may have more merit on it to compensate for that lower offensive oomph. Energy Ball provides a Special-based Grass-type attack for you to strike with, while Psyshock can be used in place of Extrasensory, hitting with 80 power but calculating damage using the foe's Defense stat rather than their Special Defense. Sunny Day is very helpful for Ninetales (assuming you don't have the Drought variant) to raise the power of its Fire-type attacks by 50% and to weaken the power of Water-type attacks by 50%. Even though you don't get the TM for it until after beating the game, SolarBeam works well with that combination. Dig isn't overly strong on its own, but it is capable of learning it, and since its Attack and Special Attack are roughly the same without any boosts, it can still hit fairly hard for a Ninetales. Attract can work well in conjunction with Confuse Ray to keep the foe from attacking, but it requires two of your moves to pull that off. Ninetales isn't all that diverse, but it has Psychic- or Grass-type backup, so you won't miss the lack of diversity with that strategy. It gets some Move Tutor moves as well that can help. Dark Pulse (10 Blue Shards) is a very helpful, Special-based Dark-type attack with a respectable 80 power and a 20% chance of causing the foe to flinch. Heat Wave for 10 Yellow Shards is also a viable replacement for Flamethrower and Fire Blast, hitting all adjacent foes (foes only!) in a Double or Triple Battle, plus it ekes out a little more power than Flamethrower — at the cost of a 10% accuracy loss.

As alluded to earlier, Ninetales has a lot of top-rate Fire-type Pokemon to compete with, and there's nothing it does that really sets it far apart — at least, assuming you don't have the magical Drought Ninetales. With Drought, it has a lot more merit, but otherwise you're going to need to use a turn setting up either Sunny Day or Nasty Plot before you have the offensive power that the other Fire-types possess. Magmortar, Chandelure, and Volcarona are all better choices on the Special-based end, while Darmanitan outclasses it for sure in the Physical-based world. Arcanine is also a much better choice, but only if you can wait until level 44 for it to learn its best attacks — and if you're thinking of using a Vulpix at this point in the game, you should consider using a Growlithe for those levels, since level 44 is nothing at this point and you'll have a very solid Fire-type. It's still a good Fire-type Pokemon, though, so if you genuinely want to use Ninetales, you won't be too disappointed. I just can't rate it as highly since you get it so late in the game and there are simply too many better Fire-types out there, which absolutely affects my rating for it.

4 starBronzongPokemon Review: Bronzong
Bronzong Sprite
Steel / Psychic

Bronzong may be a big old bell, but this thing is about as durable as it gets. You don't even have to bother with its previous evolution, Bronzor, as you just get a Bronzong right from the get go. It is a beefy Steel/Psychic-type Pokemon, giving it a whole ton of resistances and very few weaknesses. In fact, its only weaknesses are Fire- and Ground-type attacks. It has two possible abilities that can help those weaknesses, though: Levitate and Heatproof. Levitate gets rid of that pesky weakness to Ground, turning it into an immunity instead, while Heatproof gives it a "resistance" to Fire-type attacks — which essentially negates its weakness to Fire-type attacks. Levitate is generally better, but both are helpful and leave your Bronzong with just one weakness. For stats, it has some incredible Defense and Special Defense, making it a very tough bell to crack! Its HP is a little lacking, but those defensive stats more than make up for it. Despite its defensive nature, it actually has some nice Attack, reaching a little bit above average, and its Special Attack, while not incredible, maintains a respectable average mark. Its Speed is dirt slow, though, but that can almost work to its advantage if you play your cards right.

Bronzong can learn a whole ton of moves by level up, which is really something. It'll start off with Gyro Ball, Block, Metal Sound, and Future Sight. Gyro Ball hits for more damage depending on how much slower Bronzong is compared to the foe. Holding something like a Macho Brace can help push its Speed even lower, thus raising its power. Block prevents the foe from switching or running away and is generally useless in-game. Metal Sound lowers the foe's Special Defense by two stages and is, uh, ok, but not necessary, while Future Sight is just a pain to get set up and should not be used. It gets Extrasensory at level 42, but that's really an afterthought, since Psychic (see TMs) is much better. Payback is learned at level 46 (or via TM) and it does double damage if Bronzong acts after the foe, which is will most of the time, plus it's a Physical-based attack, which Bronzong likes to see. Heavy Slam, learned at level 58, hits harder depending on how much heavier Bronzong is compared to the foe. Anything less than 136 lbs. will be hit for at least 80 power, with much lighter Pokemon getting hit for as much as 120 power. Bronzong doesn't make the best use of it, but it can usually keep up with Gyro Ball's power, except it has more PP. It has some very useful moves it can learn by swapping Heart Scales with the Reminder Girl, too. Hypnosis is incredibly useful, putting the foe to sleep 60% of the time. Bronzong can almost always afford to take a couple of hits before putting the foe to sleep, and once it's asleep, you can set up however you want. Confuse Ray isn't the best option for it, but it's still an option. Lastly, Iron Defense boosts its Defense by two stages and can be handy if you're planning on using it solely against Physical-based attackers.

It is graced by learning a whole ton of TM moves, although it benefits from a lot of the crazier support moves, too, just given its nature. There's one TM move in specific that needs to be mentioned first and foremost: Trick Room, which causes the turn order to be reversed for the next couple of turns, meaning Bronzong's low Speed result in it going first for several turns. This can be incredible for letting it strike first, plus it works well in conjunction with slower Pokemon on your team. It doesn't affect Gyro Ball, either, if that's the way you want to go. Anyway, that being said, some other attacks it can learn are Rock Slide for some decent Rock-type damage (and it can actually appreciate that 30% flinch chance if it goes before the foe), Psychic for a much better Psychic-type attack than anything it's got normally, Charge Beam for weak damage, but for the potential to raise its Special Attack pretty quickly, or Shadow Ball for some Ghost-type damage should that be desired, but you're usually better with Payback. Earthquake is also available after beating the game, although Bulldoze can work in the meantime if you need a Ground-type attack (although it does not work well with Trick Room or Gyro Ball). Crazy as it is, Dream Eater may actually work well with Bronzong, because often times you want to put the foe to sleep with it before you start attacking, so you might as well heal up some HP. You have to watch the timing, though, because if Bronzong is slower, the foe may wake up on the turn you use Dream Eater. Think it ends there? Oh no. In addition to Trick Room, Bronzong has a ton of other support TM moves to learn. It can get both Light Screen and Reflect to make it pretty much unbreakable while also boosting the defensive might of the rest of your team for a couple of turns. Sunny Day and Rain Dance can both be learned to help with support as well, with Rain Dance being the safer option for Bronzong as it will cut the power of Fire-type attacks by 50%. Toxic is great for whittling away the foes and can be used against nearly every foe in the Pokemon League in combination with some spam healing for an easy win (preferably with the other defensive moves going). Rock Polish raises its Speed by two stages, although you're probably going to need it twice before you'll have a chance at sweeping things. Flash, believe it or not, can be very crippling if you're planning on doing a lot of set up (Double Team is better after beating the game). Substitute is also an option, to say the least, as is Rest for some free healing (works great with Toxic), although since you get so much money throughout the game, I usually prefer just using a Hyper Potion or Full Restore if you need to heal.

Does it end there? No, not quite, as there's still a few Move Tutor moves it can pick up. Iron Head (4 Red Shards) is a good option for it if you just want a reliable Physical-based Steel-type attack it can attack with. It hits for 80 power and has 100% accuracy, so there's no frills behind it, and it has a nice 15 PP to work with. It also has a 30% chance of causing the foe to flinch, but only if you act before they do, so Trick Room or Rock Polish will need to be in effect. Signal Beam (also 4 Red Shards) can be helpful if you're looking to mess with Dark-type Pokemon. After beating the game, it can learn Stealth Rock for 10 Green Shards in Nacrene City to set up some hazard damage for the foe and is great when leading against Trainers with at least 3 Pokemon on their teams (especially human foes), while Sleep Talk (12 Green Shards) works nicely with Rest for an invincible Bronzong that will spam attacks.

If there's one thing that Bronzong does very well, it's take hits like a champ. It has far fewer weaknesses than most other Steel-type Pokemon out there, plus decent enough Attack to strike with. However, there is a Pokemon that really makes you think twice about using Bronzong: Metagross. Metagross shares the same types as Bronzong, except it drastically outclasses Bronzong in every stat except for Special Defense, plus it has just outrageous Attack. But Metagross is built to do serious damage while Bronzong is built to whittle away at the foe, and attacks like Hypnosis really help Bronzong's cause. You're probably better off using Metagross, but if you prefer something more defensive, you'll find Bronzong to be more than sufficient.

As soon as you enter, you'll see some people talking about Landorus. The lady tells you about Thundurus and Tornadus, too, but all three of them will eventually wander off.

Anyway, head west until you find a house, and then keep going west until you find a one-way ledge. There's actually a hidden Calcium over there. Head back to the house and then go north until you see some tilled soil. In the northeast corner, before climbing up the second set of steps, is a hidden TinyMushroom.

The Youngster just to the north uses a Skorupi L39 and a Seviper L39. Yeah, he's pretty darn easy. To the east of him is a Shiny Stone, which is always nice to have. Near that is a Hidden Grotto, where you may be able to find a Pokemon with a Hidden Ability in. Check the odd clump of trees and see if there's anything inside. You can find Amoonguss, Bronzor, or, rarely, Vulpix in there, but you might not find anything, either, so you will have to check back often.

Abundant Shrine Hidden Grotto (East)
Amoonguss Amoonguss  Lv. 35-40
Regenerator
Bronzor Bronzor  Lv. 35-40
Heavy Metal
Vulpix Vulpix  Lv. 35-40
Drought
Eevee Eevee  Lv. 35-40
Anticipation

Go back to the tilled soil and then head west to find some Twins. They'll fight you in a Double Battle, and they each use a Swablu L38. Past them, don't bother heading south, as that just takes you to that ledge earlier. Instead, climb the steps and fight the Lass, who uses a Deerling L39 and a Zangoose L39. To the east of her is a Max Revive, which is always handy.

Climb the steps near the Lass and then head north of the tilled soil to find a hidden Big Mushroom near the flowers. To the east of that is a Youngster, and he's got a Karrablast L37, a Joltik L37, a Scolipede L37, and a Shelmet L37. Southeast of him is TM92 (Trick Room), which can be a great move for some of your slower Pokemon to use to help remedy their shortcomings (Reuniclus comes to mind).

North of the Youngster is the shrine where Landorus would appear in Black and White if you brought Thundurus and Tornadus there. In this game, though, you can bring Therian Forme Landorus here to receive the Reveal Glass, which allows you to change the formes of the trio. You can only get the Therian Formes by playing on the Nintendo 3DS app, the Pokemon Dream Radar.

Anyway, head over to the east, pick up the Heal Ball, and stop by the Hidden Grotto right nearby. That one can have either an Amoonguss, a Golduck, or a Swablu with its Hidden Ability, though they aren't found in there all the time (you'll have to check back every so often).

Abundant Shrine Hidden Grotto (North)
Amoonguss Amoonguss  Lv. 35-40
Regenerator
Golduck Golduck  Lv. 35-40
Swift Swim
Swablu Swablu  Lv. 35-40
Cloud Nine
Eevee Eevee  Lv. 35-40
Anticipation

Further east is a PKMN Breeder, but don't worry, he won't fight you. Instead, he'll give you the Funfest Mission "Fertilizer Collector!". Lovely. Pick up the Rare Candy right by him, then even more importantly, swing on over to the other side of the tilled soil to pick up the hidden PP Max. Woohoo!

Well, that's all there is for you to do here now, so it's time to head back on over to the Pokemon League! (Or to check it out for the first time if you were patient and didn't stop by the Pokemon Center first.)